Monthly archives: December, 2008

Neurolaw and Criminal Justice

Ken Strutin’s article highlights selected recent publications, news sources and other online materials concerning the applications of cognitive research to criminal law as well as basic information on the science and technology involved.

Subjects: Criminal Law, Features

Deep Web Research 2009

Marcus P. Zillman’s guide includes links to: articles, papers, forums, audios and videos, cross database articles, search services and search tools, peer to peer, file sharing, grid/matrix search engines, presentations, resources on deep web research, semantic web research, and bot research resources and sites.

Subjects: Data Mining, Features, Legal Research, Search Engines, Search Strategies

The Government Domain: Wrapping Up 2008

E-gov expert Peggy Garvin provides an overview of the significant developments in the world of online government information this past year. According to Peggy, overall the year saw a push by individuals and nongovernment organizations for increased access to digital government information. Specifically, new official government and non-government websites came online, and existing sites developed more sophisticated features.

Subjects: Columns, Congress, Government Resources, Legislative, The Government Domain

A Guide for the Perplexed: Libraries and the Google Library Project Settlement

Jonathan Band’s article outlines the settlement’s provisions, with special emphasis on the provisions that apply directly to libraries. The settlement is extremely complex (over 200 pages long, including attachments), so this paper of necessity simplifies many of its details.

Subjects: Copyright, Features, Legal Research, Libraries & Librarians, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Technology Trends

E-Discovery Update: My E-Discovery Holiday Wish List

Conrad J. Jacoby’s holiday wish is for the legal community to finally develop one or more judicially accepted standards that can be used to craft consistent ways of requesting and producing information. With baseline procedures in place, both producing and requesting parties, as well as judges, will be able to make more informed decisions about the need for discovery and the way in which such discovery should be conducted.

Subjects: Case Management, Discovery, E-Discovery
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