LLRX November 2022 Issue

Articles and Columns for November 2022

  • 10 fatal traps that explain why law firm strategic plans are DOA – Patrick J. McKenna is an internationally recognized author, lecturer, strategist and seasoned advisor to the leaders of premier law firms. McKenna’s deep dive into law firm strategic planning delivers a detailed guide on the major errors to circumvent to establish a winning competitive position going forward.
  • For 2023, which tech tools might help your firm flourish?Nicole L. Black’s actionable checklist begins with an end of year review of your law firm’s achievements and challenges to determine issues and new requirements moving forward. The review will include conducting an audit of your workflow and technology to identify process gaps and ensure efficiency and profitability in the new year. When the audit is completed, identify and implement technologies and service providers that will bridge the gaps identified and establish the foundation for success.
  • The national library endowment vision must evolve – The LibraryEndowment.org started around nine years ago. A national library endowment would reduce the inequalities of the U.S. library world, especially those tied to geography, class, and race. David H. Rothman shares his personal views on topline issues this project faces moving forward: how libraries could accept money from the super-rich while retaining their independence, and the increasing desirability of national digital library systems funded by the endowment, among other sources.
  • 55 Select Books on Longevity and Productive Aging – Author, Editor, Speaker, Blogger Bruce Rosenstein shares recommendations on a selected list of literature about an increasingly impactful topic – longevity and productive aging. Rothstein references one book per author and in some cases it is their most recent book.
  • Elon Musk’s ‘hardcore’ management style: a case study in what not to do – Professor Libby Sander explains why as a case study in how to implement organisational change, Elon Musk’s actions at Twitter will go down as the gold standard in what not to do. Among other things, the evidence shows successful organisational change requires: a clear, compelling vision that is communicated effectively; employee participation; and fairness in the way change is implemented. Trust in leaders is also crucial. Change management never quite goes to plan. It’s hard to figure out whether Musk even has a plan at all.
  • Red flag laws and the Colorado LGBTQ club shooting – questions over whether state’s protection order could have prevented tragedyProfessor Alex McCourt, an expert on gun laws at Johns Hopkins University, explains how red flag laws are supposed to work – and why they weren’t triggered in this case.
  • No, an indictment wouldn’t end Trump’s run for the presidency – he could even campaign or serve from a jail cell – Donald Trump announced his 2024 run for the presidency on Nov. 15. In his address he railed against what he perceived as the “persecution” of himself and his family, but made scant mention of his legal woes. Confirmation of Trump’s White House bid comes at a curious time – a week after a lackluster Republican midterm performance that many blamed on him. Moreover, it comes as the former president faces multiple criminal investigations over everything from his handling of classified documents, to allegations of falsifying the value of New York properties. There is also the not-so-small matter of a Justice Department investigation into the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol. The announcement has led some to speculate that Trump may be hoping that becoming a presidential candidate will in some way shield him from prosecution. Stefanie Lindquist, Foundation Professor of Law and Political Science, Arizona State University, answers critical questions including: does an indictment – or even a felony conviction – prevent a presidential candidate from running or serving in office?
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, November 26, 2022Four highlights from this week: A Broken Twitter Means Broken Disaster Response; Third-party data brokers give police warrantless access to 250 million devices; House Dems say facial recognition company misrepresented its help to consumers; and Do’s and don’ts of data de-identification.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, November 19, 2022Four highlights from this week: Google Settles 40 States’ Location Data Suit for $392 Million; FBI Alert: Watch Out for Subscription Renewal Scams; GAO Science & Tech Spotlight: Zero Trust Architecture; and Employee tracking: From your keystrokes to your emails, here’s what your employer can see.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, November 12, 2022Four highlights from this week: Google Settles 40 States’ Location Data Suit for $392 Million; FBI Alert: Watch Out for Subscription Renewal Scams; GAO Science & Tech Spotlight: Zero Trust Architecture; and Employee tracking: From your keystrokes to your emails, here’s what your employer can see.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, November 5, 2022Four highlights from this week: Four highlights from this week: 2023 Privacy Guide; TikTok allows employees in China to access European data; Public Entities in Nearly Every State Use Federally-Banned Foreign Tech, Report Says; and Malicious App Developer Remains on Google Play.
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Subjects: KM

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, December 3, 2022

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: 5 cybersecurity predictions for 2023; Cops Can Extract Data From 10,000 Different Car Models’ Infotainment Systems; A Peek Inside the FBI’s Unprecedented January 6 Geofence Dragnet; and Thinking about taking your computer to the repair shop? Be very afraid.

Subjects: Big Data, Congress, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email, Email Security, KM, Privacy, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Social Media, Spyware, Travel

10 fatal traps that explain why law firm strategic plans are DOA

Patrick J. McKenna is an internationally recognized author, lecturer, strategist and seasoned advisor to the leaders of premier law firms. McKenna’s deep dive into law firm strategic planning delivers a detailed guide on the major errors to circumvent to establish a winning competitive position going forward.

Subjects: Communication Skills, Economy, Information Architecture, Information Management, KM, Law Firm Marketing, Leadership, Legal Profession, Management

For 2023, which tech tools might help your firm flourish?

Nicole L. Black’s actionable checklist begins with an end of year review of your law firm’s achievements and challenges to determine issues and new requirements moving forward. The review will include conducting an audit of your workflow and technology to identify process gaps and ensure efficiency and profitability in the new year. When the audit is completed, identify and implement technologies and service providers that will bridge the gaps identified and establish the foundation for success.

Subjects: Information Architecture, Information Management, KM, Legal Technology

The national library endowment vision must evolve

The LibraryEndowment.org started around nine years ago. A national library endowment would reduce the inequalities of the U.S. library world, especially those tied to geography, class, and race. David H. Rothman shares his personal views on topline issues this project faces moving forward: how libraries could accept money from the super-rich while retaining their independence, and the increasing desirability of national digital library systems funded by the endowment, among other sources.

Subjects: Education, KM, Librarian Resources

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, November 26, 2022

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: A Broken Twitter Means Broken Disaster Response; Third-party data brokers give police warrantless access to 250 million devices; House Dems say facial recognition company misrepresented its help to consumers; and Do’s and don’ts of data de-identification.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Blockchain, Congress, Criminal Law, Cryptocurrency, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Employment Law, Legal Research, Privacy

Elon Musk’s ‘hardcore’ management style: a case study in what not to do

Professor Libby Sander explains why as a case study in how to implement organisational change, Elon Musk’s actions at Twitter will go down as the gold standard in what not to do. Among other things, the evidence shows successful organisational change requires: a clear, compelling vision that is communicated effectively; employee participation; and fairness in the way change is implemented. Trust in leaders is also crucial. Change management never quite goes to plan. It’s hard to figure out whether Musk even has a plan at all.

Subjects: Communication Skills, Employment Law, Ethics, KM, Labor Law, Leadership, Management, Social Media, Technology Trends, Telecommuting

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, November 19, 2022

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Google Settles 40 States’ Location Data Suit for $392 Million; FBI Alert: Watch Out for Subscription Renewal Scams; GAO Science & Tech Spotlight: Zero Trust Architecture; and Employee tracking: From your keystrokes to your emails, here’s what your employer can see.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Communications, Computer Security, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, Email, Freedom of Information, Legal Research, Search Engines, Social Media, Spyware