Category «Case Management»

2020 KM + Innovation Survey Results

Ron Friedman’s extensively documented article reports on the survey to support the 2020 Strategic Knowledge + Innovation Legal Leaders’ Summit, which took place in early February 2020. The Summit is a meeting of about 65 senior knowledge management professionals from large US, UK, and Canadian law firms. The depth and breath of actionable information and data shared in this article makes it a critical read for law firm and corporate KM and Innovation professionals.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Case Management, Communication Skills, Communications, Contact Management, Data Mining, Digital Archives, Information Architecture, Information Mapping, KM, Leadership, Legal Marketing, Legal Technology, Management, Presentation Skills, Team Building

Automation in MS Outlook

This guide by legal tech expert Catherine (Sanders) Reach is a must-read for every Outlook user seeking to implement value added features and functions that are currently underused, or not used at all. Many of us spend a good portion of our day in Outlook, receiving and responding to email, sending and filing attachments, scheduling appointments, responding to meetings, and updating contacts. Sanders Reach identifies key shortcuts, tools and techniques already built into application, as well as third-party add-ins, to help manage your communications much more effectively.

Subjects: Case Management, Communications, Contact Management, Email

The Decade in Legal Tech: The 10 Most Significant Developments

Robert Ambrogi describes and identifies why this was a decade of tumult and upheaval in legal technology, bringing changes that will forever transform the practice of law and the delivery of legal services. From the ubiquity of big data, to migrating applicationsto the cloud, and the increasing adoption AI, Ambrogi’s keen insights and comprehensive expertise make this article critical reading.

Subjects: AI, Case Management, Law Firm Marketing, Legal Ethics, Legal Research, Legal Technology, Technology Trends

Terms, Tags, and Classification

It is helpful to classify documents or other content items to make them easier to find later. Searching the full text alone can retrieve inaccurate results or miss appropriate documents containing different words from the words entered into a search box. A document or content management system may include features for tagging, keywords, categories, indexing, etc. Taxonomist Heather Hedden identifies the difference between these elements to facilitate the implementation of more effective knowledge and content management.

Subjects: Business Research, Case Management, Competitive Intelligence, E-Discovery, Information Architecture, Information Mapping, KM

Stagnation And The Legal Industry (Part 2) What Real Transformative Change Could Look Like

In his article Ken Grady describes one possible future for the legal services that embodies radical transformation. He bases this new paradigm on Elon Musk’s premise: the only things unchangeable are the laws of nature. In the case of your law practice this means that regulations, custom, habits, and processes and procedures are all the focus of actionable change. Grady suggests specific ways that the innovative use of current technology and how you approach your work and client services can effectively and positively impact the not too distant future of your profession.

Subjects: AI, Case Management, E-Discovery, KM, Law Firm Marketing, Legal Profession, Legal Research, Legal Technology

Judging Lawyers: Objectively Evaluating Big Law Litigation Departments

Itai Gurari talks about a new tool from Judicata called Clerk that analyzes and grades briefs, evaluating their strengths and weaknesses, looking for areas of improvement and attack. Clerk’s analysis spans seven dimensions that measure how well the brief is argued, how well it is drafted, and the context within which it arises.

Subjects: Big Data, Case Management, Competitive Intelligence, Legal Marketing, Legal Research, Legal Technology

Cut and Paste Opinions: A Turing Test for Judicial Decision-Making

Ken Strutin argues that cut-and-paste is a laudable method for reducing transcription errors in copying citations and quotations. However, he identifies that a problem arises when it is used to lift verbatim sections of a party’s arguments into a case decision. Stipulations and proposed orders from counsel for both parties might be enviable and practicable, but judgment and fact-finding are solely in the province of the court. This has been a long standing issue that has spanned technologies from shears and paste-pot to typewriters and computers, and which might culminate in a Turing Test for case law.

Subjects: Case Management, Court Resources, Courts & Technology, KM, Legal Profession