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Ernest Svenson was born in New Orleans, but spent four years attending high school in the Republic of Panama. He returned to New Orleans in 1977 to attend Tulane University, where he received a B.A. in Philosophy in 1980. He entered Loyola Law School in 1982, and was graduated cum laude. He was a teaching assistant for several professors, a member of the National Moot Court team, a member of the Law Review editorial board, as well as participant in the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. After graduation, Ernest spent two years clerking for the Honorable Adrian G. Duplantier in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana, where he learned the intricacies of federal procedure. He also learned the proper method of preparing blackened redfish.
Over the years, Ernest has been involved in a number of bar activities as well as law alumni matters. From 1990 to 1994 he was on the editorial board of the ABA Section of Litigation's publication entitled "Litigation News." He has been an adjunct professor at Loyola Law School and participated with the school's moot court program. In 1998 he was recipient of the Loyola Moot Court Distinguished Alumni Award. In 1999, he became president of the St. Thomas More Inn of Court.
Since entering the practice of law in 1987 Ernest has been involved in a wide variety of commercial litigation. He has handled disputes involving securities, banking, and insurance related matters in both state and federal court, although his practice has mostly been concentrated in federal court. Lately, his practice has been focused on franchise litigation, intellectual property matters and products liability cases. He is a member of all o f the federal district courts in Louisiana, the United States Fifth Circuit, and the United States Supreme Court. He speaks and writes fluent Spanish, and spends far too much time with his weblog.

The Internet Roundtable #37: Are Blogs Right For Law Firm

Dennis Kennedy (DK): Last month we explained blogs and how to get started, but there’s more. If that were all that’s going on with blogs, I’d be saying what’s the big deal? How are blogs any different from web sites? Aren’t email newsletters a better vehicle for content delivery? There is much more to blogging and this brings us to my favorite aspects of blogs and why I do think that they are changing the Internet: the world of newsfeeds, RSS feeds, XML feeds and news aggregators. We have two special guests who will help us understand blogging.

Subjects: Blogs, Internet Roundtable

The Internet Roundtable #36 – A Continuing Discussion of Law Firm Marketing On the Internet – What Are Blogs and Why Is Everyone So Excited About Them?

Dennis Kennedy (DK): When I notice that both Jerry Lawson and I have commented publicly that the energy and excitement around blogging remind us of 1995 and the early days of creating web pages, it’s clear that blogging is a topic that deserves some attention, especially because of the ways lawyers are already beginning to use blogs for marketing their practices. Not only do we have an exciting topic, we also have two great special guests for this edition of Internet Roundtable. Our first special guest is a celebrity among lawyers who blog, one of the early pioneers among legal bloggers, Ernest Svenson is the technology partner at the New Orleans firm of Gordon, Arata, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan. He’s far better known as “Ernie the Attorney,” which is the name of his blog. Because it has been so successful, it was recently in an LLRX.com article called Web Logs for Lawyers: Lessons from Ernie the Attorney that attracted a lot of attention.

Subjects: Blogs, Internet Roundtable

Features – Adobe Acrobat For Lawyers

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By Ernest Svenson

Ernest Svenson was born in New Orleans, but spent four years attending high school in the Republic of Panama. He returned to New Orleans in 1977 to attend Tulane University, where he received a B.A. in Philosophy in 1980. He entered Loyola Law School in 1982, and was graduated cum laude. He was a teaching assistant for several professors, a member of the National Moot Court team, a member of the Law Review editorial board, as well as participant in the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. After graduation, Ernest spent two years clerking for the Honorable Adrian G. Duplantier in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana, where he learned the intricacies of federal procedure. He also learned the proper method of preparing blackened redfish.

Subjects: Adobe Acrobat, Features
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