Monthly archives: March, 2011

Emerging Legal Issues in Social Media: Part II

This is the second installment of an examination of notable and new developments in social media and legal practice. Part One highlighted important statutes, case law, ethics opinions, along with extensive news media coverage of law-related social media issues. Part Two focuses on recent items that have appeared in professional journals and blogs, 1 law reviews, reports, books and secondary resources, along with references to current awareness sources. 2

Subjects: Features

FOIA Facts: Funding FOIA

Scott A. Hodes contends that reducing FOIA Operations any further is the wrong way to go if the objectives of increasing government transparency are to be pursued. The actual process of searching for records in response to FOIA requests and processing those requests requires human interaction – in other words, while the documents themselves can be digitized, a person will always be required to search for and process responsive records.

Subjects: Congress, E-Government, FOIA Facts, Government Resources, Legal Research

SharePoint, Training Not Required

Lorette Weldon’s research has identified that librarians are using SharePoint in the corporate, government, and non-profit sectors. She expertly identifies and illustrates how to leverage the power of this application through an understanding of the site templates that Microsoft bundles in SharePoint “out-of-the-box”. These templates are based on social networking abilities and not program coding. Through “plug and play” efforts librarians can find the features in SharePoint that will assist them in managing their multifaceted “collections.”

Subjects: Features, Libraries & Librarians, Library Marketing, Library Software & Technology

Knowledge Discovery Resources 2011 – An Internet MiniGuide Annotated Link Compilation

This new guide by Marcus P. Zillman focuses on the most current and reliable resources for knowledge discovery available on the Internet. With the constant addition of new and pertinent information to the web, it is very easy to experience information overload. A critical requirement for researchers is finding the best knowledge discovery resources and sites in both the visible and invisible World Wide Web. These carefully selected knowledge and information discovery sources will help you accomplish your research goals.

Subjects: Features, Legal Research, Search Engines

Breaking Down Link Rot: The Chesapeake Project Legal Information Archive’s Examination of URL Stability*

This guide for researches by Sarah Rhodes focuses on the highly significant impact of “link rot”, which refers to the loss or removal of content at a particular Uniform Resource Locator (URL) over time. When an attempt is made to open a documented link, either different or irrelevant information has replaced the expected content, or else the link is found to be broken, typically expressed by a 404 or “not found” error message. This is not an uncommon occurrence. Web-based materials often disappear as URLs change and web sites are changed, updated, or deleted.

Subjects: Digital Archives, Information Management, Legal Research, Libraries & Librarians, Library Software & Technology, Technology Trends, Web Management, Web-Based Training
CLOSE
CLOSE