Category «Library Software & Technology»

Bluebook Technologies

The Bluebook is the standard citation guide for legal materials. There are now three format choices for the Bluebook: paper, online subscription (since 2008), and as of August 10, 2012 – iPad app. Law Librarian, author, research instructor and blogger Mary Whisner’s guide discusses and illustrates the features and pricing of each.

Subjects: Legal Research Training, Libraries & Librarians, Library Software & Technology, Reference Resources

Deep Web Research 2012

Marcus P. Zillman’s extensive research over the years into the “invisible” or “deep” web indicates that it covers somewhere in the vicinity of 1 trillion plus pages of information located throughout the Internet in various files and formats that current search engines either cannot locate, or have difficulty accessing. The current search engines find hundreds of billions of pages at the time of this publication. His guide provides extensive and targeted resources to facilitate both a better understanding of the history of deep web research as well to effectively and productively search for and locate these often undiscovered but critical documents.

Subjects: Features, Information Management, Internet Filtering, Internet Resources - Web Links, KM, Legal Technology, Library Software & Technology, Open Source, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Technology Trends

National Digital Library System – Early Childhood Education and Family Literacy

David H. Rothman’s latest commentary on the DPLA states his position clearly: Priority One of a national digital library system should be early childhood education, bolstered by family literacy. Other areas also count, but early childhood education is dearest to him and among those especially likely to give the taxpayers the most for their investment. We could use tablet computers and good old-fashioned tutoring and mentoring from librarians, educators, and volunteers to help the disadvantaged–parents as well as children.

Subjects: Features, Internet Trends, Libraries & Librarians, Library Marketing, Library Software & Technology, Mobile Tech, Technology Trends

Using tablet computers, e-libraries, and family literacy initiatives to encourage young children to read

David H. Rothman continues to articulate and comprehensively document the case that a public national digital library system should serve people of all income levels and all ages, centenarians included. In this article he focuses on how books for young, disadvantaged children are one area where it could make a special difference, and how better-off families would benefit along the way.

Subjects: Features, Gadgets, Libraries & Librarians, Library Marketing, Library Software & Technology, Mobile Technology, Reference Services

Taxonomies and Thesauri

Gail Rayburn, Taxonomist, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, shares her recent presentation comprising a comprehensive, well documented analysis and guide addressing core components including: what is a taxonomy, taxonomy structure, scope notes, hierarchical relationships, synonyms, acronyms, qualifiers, sample taxonomy entries, and taxonomy development.

Subjects: Features, Information Management, Libraries & Librarians, Library Software & Technology

Commentary: Why we need two separate digital library systems – One for academics and another for the rest of America

In Mending Wall, a 1914 poem blessedly in the public domain, Robert Frost gives us a classic dictum for literature and life, and maybe for inter-organizational politics in particular: “Good fences make good neighbors.” On the whole Frost is anti-fence. But he understands his neighbor’s side; what’s more, “Mending Wall” resonates even in this era of global networks and sharable digital files. Frost died at 88 on January 29, 1963, just a little over two years after his poetry recital in the chilly Washington air at John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s inauguration; but on the Web you can still hear him reading Mending Wall and more.

Subjects: Libraries & Librarians, Library Software & Technology, Virtual Library

SharePoint, Training Not Required

Lorette Weldon’s research has identified that librarians are using SharePoint in the corporate, government, and non-profit sectors. She expertly identifies and illustrates how to leverage the power of this application through an understanding of the site templates that Microsoft bundles in SharePoint “out-of-the-box”. These templates are based on social networking abilities and not program coding. Through “plug and play” efforts librarians can find the features in SharePoint that will assist them in managing their multifaceted “collections.”

Subjects: Features, Libraries & Librarians, Library Marketing, Library Software & Technology

Breaking Down Link Rot: The Chesapeake Project Legal Information Archive’s Examination of URL Stability*

This guide for researches by Sarah Rhodes focuses on the highly significant impact of “link rot”, which refers to the loss or removal of content at a particular Uniform Resource Locator (URL) over time. When an attempt is made to open a documented link, either different or irrelevant information has replaced the expected content, or else the link is found to be broken, typically expressed by a 404 or “not found” error message. This is not an uncommon occurrence. Web-based materials often disappear as URLs change and web sites are changed, updated, or deleted.

Subjects: Digital Archives, Information Management, Legal Research, Libraries & Librarians, Library Software & Technology, Technology Trends, Web Management, Web-Based Training

Problems with Creating a Course to Help Colleagues

How many times have you wondered how to do a task or work with software? You feel wonderful once you have found a colleague who could share their “know-how” about how to complete that task more efficiently or how to implement an applications that does not have a manual that makes sense to you. Lorette S.J. Weldon focuses on four factors to consider when you want to share your knowledge on your own: cost; timing; equipment and global presentation.

Subjects: Features, Information Architecture, Information Mapping, Law Librarians, Law Library Management, Legal Research Training, Library Software & Technology, Technology Trends, Web Management

Preserving Born-Digital Legal Materials – Where to Start?

Sarah Rhodes discusses the monumental challenge of preserving our digital heritage. She argues that law libraries specifically have a critically important role to play in this undertaking as access to legal and law-related information is a core underpinning of our democratic society. Our current digital preservation strategies and systems are imperfect but tremendous strides have been made over the past decade to stave off the dreaded digital dark age, and libraries today have a number of viable tools, services, and best practices at our disposal for the preservation of digital content.

Subjects: Features, Information Management, Law Librarians, Legal Research, Legal Technology, Library Software & Technology, Technology Trends