Category «Civil Liberties»

The Government Must Now Obtain A Warrant To Compel Disclosure of Cell Phone Location Records

Attorney Charles Holster discusses the ramifications of the June 22, 2018 Supreme Court decision, Carpenter v. United States that held a warrant is required before a wireless telephone service provider may be compelled by a governmental entity to turn over its customer’s “historical” Cell Site Location Information.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Communications, Communications Law, Criminal Law, Legal Research, Privacy

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues October 21 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Note – four significant highlights of this week’s column: The Employer Surveillance State; How to Recover Google Contacts; How to delete your account with Facebook, Google, Amazon, Apple, and more; and last but certainly not least – ‘Do Not Track’ Privacy Tool Doesn’t Do Anything!

Subjects: Big Data, Civil Liberties, Congress, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, E-Commerce, E-Government, Email, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media, Spyware

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues September 29 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health/medical, to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Note – three significant highlights of this week’s column: Be careful about what you post on social media [really]; Overruling Constitutional Precedents; and If Your Data is Found on the Dark Web, Firefox Monitor Will Let You Know.

Subjects: Big Data, Civil Liberties, CRS Reports, Cybercrime, Government Resources, Health, KM, Privacy, Search Engines, Social Media, Supreme Court

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues September 8 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health/medical, to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Note – three significant highlights of this week’s column: Effort to undermine American democracy/US Elections “has not stopped,” former Facebook security chief says; How to Use Google Privacy Settings – and – U.S .accuses China of ‘super aggressive’ spy campaign on LinkedIn.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Cybersecurity, Economy, Intellectual Property, Privacy, Search Engines, Social Media, Spyware

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues September 1 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health/medical, to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways our privacy and security is diminished, often without our situational awareness. Note – two significant highlights of this week’s column: Woman Sues Border Agents to Make Them Return Data They Seized From Her Phone – and How Yahoo Is Mining For Gold in Your Junk Mail.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Data Mining, E-Commerce, Email, Government Resources, Privacy

Surveillance and Legal Research Providers: What You Need to Know

Legal research companies are selling surveillance data and services to law enforcement agencies including ICE. Their participation in government surveillance raises ethical questions about privacy, confidentiality and financial support: How private is your search history when your legal research vendors also sell surveillance data? Are you funding products that sell your patrons’ and clients’ data to ICE and other law enforcement agencies? Law professor professor and faculty services librarian Sarah Lamdan’s article focuses on how librarians uphold their privacy and intellectual freedom standards when they rely on surveillance companies for their research resources.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Law Librarians, LEXIS, Online Legal Research Services, Privacy, Social Media, Westlaw

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues July 15 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health/medical, to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways our privacy and security is diminished, often without our situational awareness. Note – a highlight of this week’s column is a very useful article – 7 Alternative Search Engines That Value Privacy.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Privacy, Search Engines

Pete Recommends – weekly highlights on cyber security issues – May 13 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health/medical, to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways our privacy and security is diminished, often without our situational awareness.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, Privacy, Social Media

Detainers, Detention and Deportation: From Presence to Personhood

Ken Strutin’s latest guide on criminal law is an expansive, extensively documented, expert work that provides researchers, scholars, lawyers, judges, advocates for criminal justice, librarians, students, and Americans, a timely and essential guide to seminal issues that are currently the subject of widespread debate – in Congress, in states and local communities across the country – and litigation – in America’s courts, the court of public opinion, and on social media. Strutin takes up the immense challenge of these volatile subjects with his first statement: “There is no such thing as an “illegal” person. For the virtues of citizenship are not exclusive to law books, but found in the dignity of individuals. Ancient peoples who made the first journeys to new lands quickly discovered that humanity is a flower that can bloom anywhere. Since then, lines on maps have served to separate people from personhood. He continues – “Immigration laws and policies have the power to conflate race, ethnicity and national origin with lawbreaking, economic rivalry, and terrorism. A targeted noncitizen occupies an indissoluble bubble of isolation and obloquy that separates them from the moral force of state laws, the integrity of its officials, and the decency of its citizens. For them America is an inside out prison comprised of sensitive locations, sanctuary cities, and degrading confinement. If the immigration system bears a resemblance to criminal justice, it is because they share a forge upon which people are hammered out.” Through the outstanding scholarship Strutin offers here, it is my hope that readers will engage with these issues that are intrinsically connected to Democracy and respect for human rights.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Court Resources, Criminal Law, Government Resources, Legal Education, Legal Research, United States Law

Caged Humanity: Conditions of Confinement and Death in Custody

“Unseen, confinement is where society’s unspent rage takes its toll on human lives. It reduces existence to a room that grows smaller with each degradation. A house of pain and trauma, its concrete walls and steel doors enclose people in jails and prisons, juvenile facilities, solitary, immigration detention and civil commitment. Incarceration intersects punishment, dignity, and end of life. And fear of its horrors are the bludgeon of interrogations, plea bargaining, and retributive justice.” This comprehensive, deeply researched and significant article by Ken Strutin compiles recent and notable reports, scholarship and news concerning the devastating spectrum of prison life and mortality. Through the perspective, insights and voluminous documentation of this leading expert on criminal justice we are given a deeper, more encompassing and meaningful understanding of a complex institutional structure that impacts the lives of millions of Americans. Strutin’s article is not only a critical legal resource but it is also a body of knowledge that calls out for understanding as well as action to ensure that civil liberties, social justice, and our belief in a just society includes the incarcerated, their families, and all of our communities.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Criminal Law, Legal Research, United States Law
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