Category «Civil Liberties»

What Supreme Court’s block of vaccine mandate for large businesses will mean for public health: 4 questions answered

The U.S. Supreme Court on January 13, 2022, blocked the Biden administration’s vaccine-or-test mandate, which applied to virtually all private companies with 100 of more employees. But it left in place a narrower mandate that requires health care workers at facilities receiving federal funds to get vaccinated. The ruling comes at a time when the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalization rates continues to soar throughout the United States as a result of the omicron variant. Debbie Kaminer, a professor of law at Baruch College, CUNY, explain the ruling’s impact.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Education, Employment Law, Healthcare, Legal Research, Supreme Court, United States Law

Putting a Spotlight on Civics Education: How Law Librarians Are Helping to Bridge the Access to Justice Gap

Diane M. Rodriguez Assistant Director of the San Francisco Law Library in California, and 2021–22 president of the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL), where one of her many goals is to advocate for access to legal information that supports access to justice. She expertly articulates the work, and the role of law librarians, that comprise this mission.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Education, Human Rights, KM, Law Librarians, Legal Research

How democracy gets eroded – lessons from a Nixon expert

Ken Hughes is a researcher with the Presidential Recordings Program of the University of Virginia’s Miller Center. Hughes argues that erosion in American democracy depends on the conspiracy theory, destructive and demonstrably false, that the 2020 election was stolen. As the author of several books on Richard Nixon – who, before Trump, was the biggest conspiracy theorist to inhabit the White House that we know of – Hughes sees conspiracy theories less as failures of rationality and more as triumphs of rationalization.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Congress, Constitutional Law, Government Resources, Legal Research

Pete Recommends Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 9, 2022

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: The Internet is Held Together With Spit & Baling Wire; To catch an insurrectionist: Facebook and Google are helping the FBI find January 6 rioters; China harvests masses of data on Western targets, documents show; and 6 Ways to Delete Yourself From the Internet.

Subjects: Big Data, Civil Liberties, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Data Mining, Financial System, Human Rights, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media

Limiting Human Rights during Pandemics

Cassandra Emmons, Cassandra Emmons a postdoctoral fellow with the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs’ t Harvard Univrsity, discusses how COVID-19 has proven that public health emergencies are not equally recognized in either international law or national constitutions; some international treaties permit “limiting” rights in the name of public health rather than requiring derogation, and nationally some governments authorize emergency measures in practice without ever doing so in name. These parallel processes and conceptual gaps create space for governments to restrict individuals’ rights with little to no international accountability during pandemics.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Comparative/Foreign Law, Government Resources, Healthcare, Legal Research

Machines Learning the Rule of Law – EU Proposes the World’s first Artificial Intelligence Act

Sümeyye Elif Biber is a PhD Candidate in Law and Technology at the Scuola Sant’Anna in Pisa. In 21 April 2021, the European Commission (EC) proposed the world’s first Artificial Intelligence Act (AIA). The proposal has received a warm welcome across the EU as well as from the US, as it includes substantial legal provisions on ethical standards. After its release, the media’s main focus laid on the proposal’s “Brussels Effect”, which refers to the EU’s global regulatory influence: EU laws exceed their “local” influence and become global standards. With the AIA, the EU has the potential to become the world’s “super-regulator” on AI. More than the Brussels Effect, however, the emphasis should lie on the EU’s intention to explicitly protect the rule of law against the “rule of technology”. Despite this expressed goal, the normative power of the regulation to ensure the protection of the rule of law seems inadequate and raises serious concerns from the perspective of fundamental rights protection. This shortcoming becomes most evident across three main aspects of the AIA, namely in the regulation’s definition of AI systems, the AI practices it prohibits, and the preeminence of a risk-based approach.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Civil Liberties, Legal Research, Privacy

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, July 18, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: YouTube Algorithm Recommends Videos that Violate the Platform’s Very Own Policies; State Data Privacy Bills Growing More Widespread; NIST Outlines Security Measures for Software Use and Testing Under Executive Order; and State Data Privacy Bills Growing More Widespread.

Subjects: Blockchain, Civil Liberties, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, Legal Research, Legislative, Privacy, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, June 6, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Two New Laws Restrict Police Use of DNA Search Method; On the Taxonomy and Evolution of Ransomware; Amazon’s Ring Finally Discloses Police Requests; and The Limits of Law and AI.

Subjects: AI, Civil Liberties, Communications, Criminal Law, Cybersecurity, Email, Gadgets/Gizmos, Legal Research, Privacy

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, April 24, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: How Do You Retire Technology and Limit Risk?; Postal Service Cops Are Monitoring Social Media: Document; FTC Says Racist Algorithms Could Get You In a Lot of Trouble; and What are the different roles within cybersecurity?

Subjects: Big Data, Civil Liberties, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email Security, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media, Spyware, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 31, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Five highlights from this week: As U.S. Capitol investigators use facial recognition, it begs the question: Who owns our faces?; Fraudulent Applicants for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) and a Surge in Criminal Referrals from Small Business Administration; U.S. Intelligence Claims China Wants to Steal Your DNA; Microsoft Deals Blow To Chrome With A Bunch Of Exciting New Edge Features; and Apple: Keep iPhone 12 and MagSafe Away From Medical Devices.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Civil Liberties, Cybersecurity, Government Resources, Healthcare, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Search Engines, Social Media, Technology Trends