Category «Comparative/Foreign Law»

International law says Putin’s war against Ukraine is illegal. Does that matter?

Hurst Hannum, Professor of International Law, Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, Tufts University acknowledges that International laws are in place to prevent war and help protect civilians and combatants alike. But he further states that these laws are challenging to enforce and are unlikely to stop the unfolding Russia-Ukraine war.

Subjects: International Legal Research, Legal Research

Pete Recommends Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 2, 2022

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: The dangers of dark data: How to manage it and mitigate the risks; US Still Lacks Federal Cyber Strategy After Decades of Attempts; The Worst Scams of 2021; and Tips for providing digital security benefits to employees.

Subjects: Comparative/Foreign Law, Congress, Copyright, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media, Spyware, Technology Trends

Limiting Human Rights during Pandemics

Cassandra Emmons, Cassandra Emmons a postdoctoral fellow with the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs’ t Harvard Univrsity, discusses how COVID-19 has proven that public health emergencies are not equally recognized in either international law or national constitutions; some international treaties permit “limiting” rights in the name of public health rather than requiring derogation, and nationally some governments authorize emergency measures in practice without ever doing so in name. These parallel processes and conceptual gaps create space for governments to restrict individuals’ rights with little to no international accountability during pandemics.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Comparative/Foreign Law, Government Resources, Healthcare, Legal Research

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, September 12, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: 8 Easy Ways to Stay Anonymous Online; Education Department Updates Rules and Criminal Penalties for Accessing Agency Data; ProtonMail Shares Activist’s IP Address With Authorities Despite Its “No Log” Claims; and As flood alerts lit up phones, did ‘warning fatigue’ set in?

Subjects: Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email Security, Encryption, International Legal Research, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media

Financial Sources on the Internet 2021

Marcus P. Zillman’s new guide comprises a list of actionable financial resources from the U.S. and abroad, organized by four subject areas: Corporate Conference Calls Resources, Financial Sources, Financial Sources Search Engines, and Venture Capital Sources. Content includes: sources for news and updates on business, corporations and marketplaces; sources from the NGO/IGO sectors; data, databases and charts; search applications; resources for investors and money management; and market analysis tools.

Subjects: Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, Economy, Financial System, Government Resources, International Legal Research, Legal Research

Pete Recommends Weekly highlights on cyber security issues July 12, 2020

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Your Smart Speaker Is Listening When It Shouldn’t; The U.S. is ‘looking at’ banning TikTok, cites Chinese surveillance; How Google Docs became the social media of the resistance; and Google Maps Launches New Features To Help People Navigate Coronavirus Hotspots.

Subjects: AI, Civil Liberties, Comparative/Foreign Law, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Health, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Search Engines, Technology Trends

If My AI Wrote this Post, Could I Own the Copyright?

Todd A Carpenter, Executive Director of the National Information Standards Organization (NISO), discusses the factors that have brought us to an inflection point with a new technology, artificial intelligence (AI), and associated questions about the boundaries of intellectual property rights. Carpenter contends there could be profound implications for the publishing and scientific communities, which are becoming key sources of training data for artificial intelligence systems, as well as for publishers themselves, potentially becoming reliant on artificial intelligence for creation, curation and engagement of new content. In this article he reports on a forum hosted by WIPO and the Copyright Office that focused on whether copyright can apply to the works created by artificial intelligence systems.

Subjects: AI, Comparative/Foreign Law, Copyright, Intellectual Property, KM, Legal Research, Technology Trends, United States Law

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues October 14 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health/medical, to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Note – three significant highlights of this week’s column: Consumer genetic testing that it’s now possible for law enforcement agencies to use genetic data to hunt down virtually anyone of European descent; FBI chief says threats from drones to U.S. ‘steadily escalating’; and Voice Phishing Scams Are Getting More Clever.

Subjects: Cybersecurity, E-Government, Government Resources, Privacy, RSS Newsfeeds, Terrorism