Category «Cyberlaw»

Features – Could you be sued for turning over an Internet user's sign-up information to law enforcement? A cautionary tale for libraries and other Internet service providers.

Could you be sued for turning over an Internet user’s sign-up information to law enforcement? A cautionary tale for libraries and other Internet service providers

By Mary Minow

Subjects: Cyberlaw, Features, Internet Filtering, Privacy

Identity Theft: An Annotated Bibliography of Federal, State, Consumer and News Resources

Identity Theft: A Bibliography of Federal, State, Consumer and News Resources

By Sabrina I. Pacifici

Subjects: Congress, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cyberlaw Legislation, Features, Government Resources, Privacy

Features – Linking Policies for Public Web Sites

Linking Policies for Public Web Sites In our increasingly litigious society, they are now essential

By Shirley Duglin Kennedy

Subjects: Cyberlaw, Features, Web Management

Notes from the Technology Trenches – September, 1999

Notes from the Technology Trenches By Roger Skalbeck

Roger Skalbeck is the Electronic Initiatives Librarian at Howrey & Simon in Washington, D.C., and is the Web Master of the Law Librarian’s Society of Washington, D.C. Current work activities cover myriad aspects of electronic research resource evaluation, intranet content development, as well as research and technology training, all from a librarian’s point of view. This column reflects the personal views of the author, which are not necessarily those of his employer or any other organization. This column, of course, is 100% free of any legal advice.

Subjects: Cyberlaw, Notes from the Technology Trenches, Technology Trends, Web Management

Features – Electronic Commerce and Law on the Internet

Electronic Commerce and Law on the Internet By Bradley J. Hillis, M.A., J.D.

Bradley J. Hillis is a member of the Bar of State of Washington and the United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, author of several articles, including: “Considerations When Placing Court Opinions on the Internet,” “Internet Multimedia and Domestic Violence Prevention,” and “Internet Experiments in Electronic Court Filing.” Mr. Hillis graduated from Colorado College and holds Juris Doctor and Master of Arts degrees from the University of Washington.

Subjects: Cyberlaw, E-Commerce, Features

Features – Thinking About Linking, Part II: Can Law Accommodate the

Thinking About Linking Part II Can Law Accommodate the Power of the Internet to Share Information? By Bradley J. Hillis

Bradley J. Hillis is a member of the Washington state bar, and the author of “Internet Experiments in Electronic CourtFiling,” “Considerations When Placing Court Opinions on the Internet,” and “Legal Research on the Internet: A Simple, How To Guide.” He lives in Bellevue, Washington, and is a legal analyst for the Office of the Administrator for the Courts.

Subjects: Cyberlaw, Features, Web Management

Features – Thinking About Linking, Part I: Can Law Accommodate the

Thinking About Linking Part I Can Law Accommodate the Power of the Internet to Share Information? By Bradley J. Hillis

Bradley J. Hillis is a member of the Washington state bar, and the author of “Internet Experiments in Electronic CourtFiling,” “Considerations When Placing Court Opinions on the Internet,” and “Legal Research on the Internet: A Simple, How To Guide.” He lives in Bellevue, Washington, and is a legal analyst for the Office of the Administrator for the Courts.

Subjects: Cyberlaw, Features, Web Management
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