Deep Web Research and Discovery Resources 2019

How big is the Deep Web? It is estimated to comprise 7,500 terabytes – although an exact size is not known, and the figures vary widely on this question. The magnitude, complexity and siloed nature of the Deep Web is a challenge for researchers. You cannot turn to one specific guide or one search engine to effectively access the vast range of information, data, files and communications that comprise it. The ubiquitous search engines index, manage and deliver results from the Surface web. These search results include links, data, information, reports, news, subject matter content and a large volume of advertising that is optimized to increase traffic to specific sites and support marketing and revenue focused objectives. On the other hand, the Deep Web – which is often misconstrued as a repository of dark and disreputable information [Note – it is not the Dark Web], has grown tremendously beyond that characterization to include significant content on a wide range of subject matters covering a broad swath of files and formats, databases, pay-walled content as well as communications and web traffic that is not otherwise accessible through the surface Web. This comprehensive multifaceted guide by Marcus Zillman providers you with an abundance of resources to learn about, search, apply appropriate privacy protections, and maximize your time and efforts to conduct effective and actionable research within the Deep Web.

Subjects: Big Data, Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, Discovery, Encryption, Privacy, Search Engines, Search Strategies

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues January 19 2019

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Trick for turning your iPhone and AirPods into live spy mic goes viral; .gov security falters during U.S. shutdown; Countering Russian disinformation the Baltic nations’ way; and Why the US Government Is Terrified of Hobbyist Drones.

Subjects: Court Resources, Cybersecurity, E-Government, Privacy, Spyware

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues January 12 2019

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. four highlights from this week: The Privacy Risks of Public Location (Meta)Data; Western companies send old servers full of sensitive info to foreign countries; NSA to release a free reverse engineering tool; and Protecting Consumers and Businesses from Fraudulent Robocalls.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Cybersecurity, Privacy, Social Media

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues January 5, 2019

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Note – five significant highlights of this week’s column: Swamped by cyberthreats, citizens need government protection; How to recover from cybersecurity incidents: A 5-step plan; How much Facebook knows about you; Anonymous Patient Data May Not Be as Private as Previously Thought; and Opinion | Our Cellphones Aren’t Safe.

Subjects: AI, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Healthcare, Insurance Law, Social Media

Death of Colleague, Ken Strutin, Author of LLRX Criminal Justice Guides for 13 years

Kennard (Ken) R. Strutin, lawyer, law librarian, Director of Legal Information Services for the New York State Defenders Association, professor, author, teacher, colleague, friend and respected leader in the effort to illuminate the struggles of incarcerated persons and to champion justice for them, died on November 30, 2018 after a brief illness – he was …

Subjects: Big Data, Civil Liberties, Criminal Law, Ethics, Government Resources, Human Rights, Legal Education, Legal Ethics, Legal Research

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues December 29 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Note – five significant highlights of this week’s column: Why you should be worried about getting hacked in 2019; Robocalls and Spoofing: The Spam Call Surge Explained; Batcaves, Bulletproof Shutters, Laser Curtains: High-End Home Security Is Crazier Than You Think; Teaching Cybersecurity Law and Policy: Revised 62-Page Syllabus/Primer; and Is 2019 the year you should finally quit Facebook?

Subjects: Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, Education, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues December 22 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Note – five significant highlights of this week’s column: Market volatility: Fake news spooks trading algorithms; Hackers Find a Way to Bypass Gmail Two-Factor Authentication; It’s Time for a Bill of Data Rights; Turning Off Facebook Location Services Doesn’t Stop Tracking; and Russia and 2016: Troll group sought to recruit ‘assets’ through social media, Senate told.

Subjects: AI, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Economy, Email, Financial System, Privacy, Social Media

Will America’s libraries miss out while Harvard grows still richer? Library endowment could help.

David Rothman is an indefatigable advocate for a national library endowment. He states: “Just ten Americans are together worth more than half a trillion dollars, and the assets of the top 400 U.S. billionaires added up to a cool $2.7 trillion in October 2017. Charity-minded members of the super rich love to give to elite institutions such as Harvard. Its endowment is well north of $35 billion. The Gates Giving Pledge could free up countless billions in future years for prestigious institutions like Harvard. But will America’s libraries miss out while Harvard, Yale, and Princeton grow still richer? Very possibly, if the American Library Association and other good people in the library establishment fail to act in time.”

Subjects: E-Books, Economy, Education, Libraries & Librarians, Social Media

The Bullshit Algorithm

Jason Voiovich goes directly to the heart of the matter with his statements that are a lessons learned guide that no researcher can afford to ignore – “Wasn’t the promise of data-driven, search engine and social media algorithms that they would amplify the truth and protect us from misinformation by tapping the wisdom of crowds? The fact is that they do not. And cannot. Because that is not what they are designed to do. At the heart of every social media algorithm is a fatal flaw that values persuasion over facts. Social media platforms (as well as search engines) are not designed for truth. They are designed for popularity. They are bullshit engines.”

Subjects: Internet Resources, KM, Search Engines, Social Media

A Private Eye in The Library

Christopher Kenneally interviewed Marcy Phelps on his Copyright Clearance Center’s podcast series, Beyond the Book. A licensed private eye who earned her master’s degree in library and information science from the University of Denver, Marcy Phelps works for asset management firms, commodity pool operators, M&A professionals, and others. Her detective work combing through databases and other online data dumps helps build a definitive dossier documenting any litigation, bankruptcies, and regulatory actions that could raise unpleasant questions for investors and even uncover unsavory characters.

Subjects: Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, KM, Legal Research
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