Category «Legal Marketing»

Nothing Artificial About It: How Law Firms (Really) Use AI in Practice

Ed Walters, CEO of Fastcase, talks about how the new age of law firm innovation is changing legal services by moving from anecdotal to data-driven insights and thus providing better-informed guidance for clients. Walters also identifies the value of analytics to manage and mitigate risk, which he points out is almost always more cost effective than litigating the effects after the fact. Most importantly, Walters highlights not only how law firms are using AI, but that they are also building their own tools to deliver new types of services as well.

Subjects: AI, Legal Marketing, Legal Technology, Technology Trends

LinkedIn 2019 Talent Trends: Soft Skills, Transparency and Trust

Global Industry Analyst Josh Bersin addresses critical employee workplace analysis validating people skills as highly rated employer HR and talent requirements. In professions for whom continuous delivery of outstanding customer services using collaborative and dynamic team efforts is the norm, Bersin’s data driven analysis is a benchmark to expand upon organizational mission, vision and values.

Subjects: AI, Communication Skills, KM, Leadership, Management

Book Review of “Frenemies: The Epic Disruption of the Ad Business (and Everything Else)”

Advertising is now part of a complex ecosystem that engages a wide range of components, including but not limited to: social media, Big Data, AI, data mining, competitive intelligence, and marketing. Alan Rothman reveals and explains for readers just how utterly different and hyper-competitive advertising now is, with work product largely splayed across countless mobile and stationary screens on Planet Earth. Rothman describes how expertly chronicling and precisely assaying the transformative changes happening to this sector is an informative and engaging new book, Frenemies: The Epic Disruption of the Ad Business (and Everything Else), by the renowned business author Ken Auletta. Just as a leading ad agency in its day cleverly and convincingly took TV viewers on an endearing cultural tour of the U.S .as we followed the many ad-ventures of Bartles & Jaymes, so too, this book takes its readers on a far-ranging and immersive tour of the current participants, trends, challenges and technologies affecting the ad industry. Auletta’s book is not only timely and insightful, but demonstrably valuable for the professionals in the legal sector who are striving to effectively engage, employ and measure the value of marketing to clients and potential clients in a rapidly changing environment increasingly dependent upon using big data and analytical platforms.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Blockchain, Book Reviews, Communication Skills, Communications, Competitive Intelligence, Law Firm Marketing, Privacy, Social Media

My Non Life

Zena Applebaum, Corporate Strategy, Competitive Intelligence, Legal Industry Professional speaks directly to all the professionals who serve their respective organizations with many faceted skills and mission critical expertise, delivering transparent and accountable value to internal and external customers, all while shouldering the designation of a “non-lawyer.”

Subjects: KM, Law Librarians, Legal Marketing, Legal Research, Legal Technology

Can Legal Research Be Taught? Part 1: The Relevance Paradox

In the first of a three part series, Paul Gatz articulates the importance of acknowledging the “learner’s paradox” that “legal research is the process of identifying and retrieving the law-related information necessary to support legal decision-making.” Expert legal researchers conduct their work within the territory of the known and the unknown, the facts, the suppositions, and the possibilities that skilled and strategic students seek to learn and thereafter apply within their course of studies, and subsequently bring forward to support their respective practice of law. [Link to Part 2 of this series]

Subjects: Communication Skills, Law Librarians, Legal Education, Legal Research, Legal Research Training

Can Legal Research Be Taught? Part 2: Varieties of Relevance

In Part 2 of his series [see Part 1 here], Paul Gatz takes a deeper dive into the challenges of effectively teaching the “why” of a document’s relevance to assist students to understand the reasons a given document occupies the role it does within the subject literature. Gatz focuses on the concept of how knowledge in a particular discipline is created, disseminated, and organized (subject knowledge relevance). Gatz states that knowledge content of a discipline is helpful in determining the relevance of a particular document, but an effective relevance determination relies upon a theory of what counts as knowledge, or, in legal practice, what counts as legally valid.

Subjects: Communication Skills, Law Librarians, Legal Education, Legal Research, Legal Research Training

Judging Lawyers: Objectively Evaluating Big Law Litigation Departments

Itai Gurari talks about a new tool from Judicata called Clerk that analyzes and grades briefs, evaluating their strengths and weaknesses, looking for areas of improvement and attack. Clerk’s analysis spans seven dimensions that measure how well the brief is argued, how well it is drafted, and the context within which it arises.

Subjects: Big Data, Case Management, Competitive Intelligence, Legal Marketing, Legal Research, Legal Technology
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